When we say “We’re not Jewish, but we are Orthodox,” we mean that we hold to the Christian faith “once for all delivered to the saints” handed down and preserved for us by our spiritual fathers in the Church, who struggled for the truth of Christ even unto death. This faith, referred to in Church History as the “Orthodox Faith” is the faith of the apostles, the faith of the fathers, the faith which has established the universe.

Many when they hear the word "Orthodox" in a religious context immediately think of Judaism. However, the word “Orthodox” is properly used as a descriptive adjective for the Christian Faith, for Christians who adhere to this faith, and for Bishops who rightly divide the word of truth.

The Faith of the Apostles has been preserved and upheld through the Seven Ecumenical Councils of the Church.

Some of the greatest Bible commentaries exist in what the Church refers to as the Patristic Literature.

Bishops who rightly divide the word of truth are referred to as "Orthodox" Bishops.